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Course Description

Speakers have not been selected for the 2017 session, but the following depicts previous offerings:

 

Modules

The Role of Nonprofits/NGOs in Lobbying and Advocacy

Sara Crickenberger worked for nine years as CEO of the American Lung Association of West Virginia (ALAWV) where she served as the organization’s lobbyist and spokesperson on advocacy issues, developed political strategy, position papers, and was the elected chair of the Coalition for a Tobacco-Free West Virginia for five years. She was awarded the Robert Wood Johnson Fellowship at the Advocacy Institute in Washington, D.C. She previously served as Assistant Director of Charleston Renaissance Corporation as well as having served five years on the City Council of Charleston, West Virginia, where she chaired the Select Committee on Urban Renewal and served as a member of the committees on Finance, Parking Facilities, Planning, Environment and Recycling, Building Facilities, and Pension Liability.

Advocacy literally surrounds us in our daily lives. In many ways, we are all advocates as we seek to pitch our own point-of-view or to influence the outcome of events no matter how large or small. In business and politics, advocates use information to influence or bring about desired changes in targeted rules, regulations, procedures or policies. The topic will explore the building blocks of advocacy, social mobility, and community organizing.


Volunteer Engagement

Having lived in Tokyo and New York throughout her life, Misako (Mimi) Yoshii has worked as a freelance interpreter in Japan and the US for embassies, television stations, and corporations for the past 30 years and most recently for the Japan Tennis Association. She was a partner at a real estate company, Warburg Associates in New York City from 1987 to 1993 and has recently joined Estatesroyal, a real estate firm in Honolulu, Hawaii. As a parent of three children, she served on the Parent Teachers Association of the American School in Japan for nearly two decades, for which she was President from 2003 to 2005, on the Board of Directors from 2003 to 2012, and remains a member of the Board of Trustees. She is currently the Asia Representative of the International Lawn Tennis Club, headquartered in Great Britain, and the Director of the International Lawn Tennis Club of Japan working globally on philanthropy through tennis. She became involved with Hands On Tokyo after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, serving on the Board before becoming the Co-Executive Director, focusing her efforts on fundraising and volunteer involvement.

In this topic we will review the whole cycle of volunteer management - needs assessment organizational policy, job description design, recruitment/input, orientation and training, monitoring, motivation and retention as well as the challenges we face. This workshop will include a combination of lecture, discussion and group exercises with the expectation that each person will come out of the workshop with some concrete ideas for how to better recruit, motivate and work with volunteers. Participants with diverse experience and field of work are welcome to join this workshop.


Gender in International Development

Kozue Akibayashi is a Professor at the Graduate School of Global Studies, Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan. She is a researcher/activist and her areas of expertise include gender studies and peace education research. Her research has focused on gender analysis of peace and security, and militarism and the possibility for demilitarization. She has conducted action research on feminist peace movements in Okinawa and other parts of the world, particularly in the areas where the US military is stationed looking at sexual violence by the military.
She has been active in international civil society organizations such as Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, one of the oldest women’s peace organizations with a 100 year history, and other transnational women’s network for demilitarization. She has also written extensively on gender, peace and security, in both Japanese and English and has appeared on Democracy Now! in 2010 and 2014, where she discussed the issues of US military presence in Okinawa. (http://www.democracynow.org/appearances/kozue_akibayashi). 

In many underdeveloped and developing countries, women lack a voice in their households, communities, and governments. Nonprofit/NGOs have historically played a role in increasing women’s opportunities and access to vital resources. This topic explores the historical and evolving role of gender in international development.

 


 Diversity and Leadership in Nonprofit Organizations 

Muadi B. Dibinga is a life strategist, motivational speaker, and independent consultant with over 30 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector.  As a consultant she provides nonprofit and for-profit companies with the information and resources they need to carry out their work. Her specialties include, but are not limited to: organizational assessments, strategic planning, diversity training and fundraising and development.

 

 

 

 

Ms. Janelle Sasaki serves as the Executive Director of Diversity & Inclusion at Ernst & Young Advisory Co., Ltd. (EYA) based in Tokyo, Japan. She advises on state of the art Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) practices in the workplace for Japan and the Asian Pacific Region. In her position, she helps top Japanese and multi-national clients on designing and executing workforce, work style and marketplace solutions to create an inclusive culture. Prior to EYA, she served as the Inclusion & Diversity Leader for Cisco Systems Japan G.K., where she launched the company-wide Inclusion & Diversity business strategy and solved workplace challenges. In 2013, Cisco Japan won the Bridge Builder Award from the Global Organization for Leadership & Diversity (GOLD). Before her transfer to Japan, she worked in Silicon Valley for over eight years.

Janelle Sasaki was selected to serve on the Women in Leadership Committee at the American Chamber of Commerce Japan. Janelle serves in leadership roles for the US Japan Council, America Japan Society and is the Co-Founder of the Japan D&I Business Round Table Network. She volunteers as a career coach for the next generation of leaders. Janelle has a passion for health and fitness and was a former competitive gymnast. Ms. Sasaki graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and holds her Professional in Human Resources (PHR) Certification. Janelle is a frequent international speaker on Diversity & Inclusion.

In this topic, we address diversity as related to global multicultural organizations. We discuss the value of diversity and inclusivity. Diversity, as a multidimensional construct, is examined as a part of organizational life fostering innovation of thought.

 


 Measuring Success 

Elizabeth Manning, Senior Operations and Program Manager, Back on My Feet. Back on My Feet (BoMF) is a national charitable organization that uses running to help those experiencing homelessness change the way they see themselves so they can make real change that results in employment and independent living. As Senior Operations and Program Manager, Ms. Manning’s primary responsibilities include directing research and evaluation initiatives across Back on My Feet’s 11 program sites. In addition, Ms. Manning is responsible for strategic operations projects, such as CRM database development, as well as grant writing.

How do you know your organization is doing good work? Is it because clients seemed to be pleased with your services or because you have a “gut feeling” that your program is having a positive effect? In today’s nonprofit environment, such vague sentiments are not enough to justify a program’s existence. Funders, donors and the community are demanding that nonprofits back up their claims of success with hard data. This session will help you understand various aspects of program evaluation; including how to connect evaluation to your program’s mission/vision, how to choose the best evaluation methods for your agency and how to use evaluation results to fuel program improvement.

Learner Outcomes

Course Objectives

After successfully completing this course, professionals will be able to:
Identify the building blocks of advocacy, social mobility, and community organizing.

  1. Describe the whole cycle of volunteer management - needs assessment organizational policy, job description design, recruitment/input, orientation and training, monitoring, motivation and retention and analyze the challenges faced by NGO’s in the implementation of a volunteer program.
  2. Identify and explain the historical and evolving role of gender in international development.
  3. Explain the value of diversity, as a multidimensional construct, and inclusivity in NGO’s.
  4. Describe NGO program evaluation in terms how to connect evaluation to a program’s mission/vision, how to choose the best evaluation methods for an agency and how to use evaluation results to fuel program improvement.

Applies Towards the Following Certificates

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